iPhone: "Gute Form" – bad design? – Symposium 2010

The iPhone is bought for its good design ("Gute Form") and easy handling, both of which distinguish the Apple design from other brand devices. To mark the anniversary of the resignation in 1930 of the second Bauhaus director, Hannes Meyer, who criticised Gropius’s "good designs" and even then called for the formulation of an "ecological design", the symposium discusses Apple’s updating of post-war German design. The fetishised iPhone is, moreover, a crude product of an exploitation of global wage differences that fails to leave a progressive ecological footprint in Asia. Lectures, films and panel discussions argue the significance, in terms of ecology and communication policy, of this obvious discrepancy between good design in consumption terms and the poor design of the manifestly non-sustainable production of electronic devices.
Free entrance, English translation available.

  • Media partner: Telepolis Munich

  •  P R O G R A M 

GOOD DESIGN – THE AESTHETIC PROMISE

3rd December 2010

  • 6 pm Opening
    Philipp Oswalt, Bauhaus Dessau Foundation
     
  • 6.30 pm Werkbund, Good design etc.
    Gerda Breuer, University of Wuppertal
     
  • 7.15 pm Ulm School of Design and Good Design
    Marcela Quijano, curator, Ulm
     
  • 7.45 pm Art and everyday culture of mobile phones
    Miya Yoshida, curator, Berlin

 
BAD DESIGN – MAKING THE INVISIBLE VISIBLE

4th December 2010

  • 10.30 am Film "The Story of Electronics"
    Annie Leonard, environmental critic, California
     
  • 10.45 am Working conditions in electronics production
    Sarah Bormann, WEED, Berlin
     
  • 11.30 am Sustainable products in the materials cycle
    Evelyn Hagenah, Federal Environment Agency, Dessau
     
  • 12.15 pm Consumer behaviour in the climate crisis
    Claudia Sprinz, Greenpeace Vienna

DISCUSSION

 
Saturday, 4th December 2010

  • Olaf Arndt, Artist and Curator, Berlin
  • Joachim Krausse, Anhalt University Dessau
  • Tim Pritlove, independent radio producer, Berlin
  • Florian Rötzer, Telepolis München